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British Columbia Canada Vancouver Island wildlife

Podcast: Photographer Christian Sasse discusses hawk chick raised by bald eagles

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An adult bald eagle with eaglet and hawklet in a nest located on Vancouver Island, Canada.

[box]NOTE: Photographer Christian Sasse hopes to broadcast live from the nest location on Vancouver Island today. His live streams are on YouTube and Periscope (links at the end of this post). [/box]

On Vancouver Island, a familiar bald eagle nest is suddenly home to a most unfamiliar scene.  

The eagle parents are not only busy feeding three eaglets in that nest.  They’re also feeding a baby red tailed hawk!

How it all came to be remains a mystery.

But there’s no doubt about who’s been capturing some spectacular, intimate moments on video.

In today’s podcast, Photographer Christian Sasse of Surrey, British Columbia shares some insights into this compelling story.

He shoots with an 800mm lens, allowing him to get extreme close-ups of the nest, while standing a great distance away.

The interview featured in today’s podcast took place the night before another ferry ride to Vancouver Island, where Sasse will return to the nest location with longtime bald eagle researcher David Hancock at his side.

VIDEO PLAYLIST: Christian Sasse videos featuring hawk chick being raised by bald eagles

 

RELATED LINKS:

Christian Sasse on YouTube

Christian Sasse on Periscope

Hancock Wildlife Foundation

Professor David Bird

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British Columbia Canada video wildlife youtube

Record-setting amateur astronomer now a rising star in Bald Eagle photography

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Christian Sasse (right) assists Bald Eagle researcher David Hancock while attending to a juvenile eagle. (photo courtesy Christian Sasse)

Christian Sasse loves pushing the limits.

He shattered a world-record when he imaged the most distant object from earth ever captured by an amateur-sized telescope.

Now, he’s taking aim at producing some magnificent wildlife photography.

This latest chapter in Sasse’s adventurous life began to unfold shortly after he moved to British Columbia in 2011.  That same year, he visited the Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival, thus igniting a passion for both the welfare (he volunteers at the Hancock Wildlife Foundation) and imagery of the majestic raptor.

And that is when Sasse decided to take-up photography. Yes, just two years ago.

Enthusiastic, rave reviews of Sasse’s photos continue to pour-in from around the world on his Facebook page. As of this writing, his page has 15.8 thousand “likes.”

Sasse regularly updates his Facebook page with fresh images, usually several times per week.

The photos intimately showcase Bald Eagles at various stages of life, from the recently hatched to the mighty, full-grown adult.

Classic Bald Eagle behaviors are also captured by Sasse’s lens(es); and we’re not only talking about the familiar “money shot” that features a flying eagle’s talons plucking a salmon from the water mere centimeters below.

For example, how many of us have witnessed a Bald Eagle standing in the muddy waters of a low-tide and patiently hunting for a midshipman (fish) that’s mostly hidden in the muck?

To top it all off, it turns-out Sasse is also quite gracious; something I learned firsthand.

Several weeks ago, I reached-out to Sasse via Facebook and asked for permission to use two of his photos in a project.  He kindly obliged.

It was while working on that project that I came across a piece of up-tempo music and thought, Christian Sasse’s photography would go great with this tune!

The rest, as they say, is history.

The music and Sasse’s photos are featured in the video below.

 

 

 

 

Categories
video Washington wildlife

Video captures young Bald Eagle’s struggle to survive

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An eaglet that recently left its nest appeared in back yards on Camano Island. It did not appear that the bird could fly. (Image courtesy Jeff Butts)

(Camano Island, WA)  When Jeff Butts learned a young Bald Eagle might be in trouble an hour away from his Edmonds home, he knew he had to take action.

“It was a no-brainer,” Butts said.

That same day, Butts made the drive to Camano Island and located the eagle.

The young bird had recently left its nest, but it wasn’t flying.

When confronted with a scene like this one, what would be the right course of action?

Call for help?

Leave the bird alone and hope that it eventually flies off?

Are there laws that prohibit people from directly intervening?

The story told in the video below helps answer those questions and several more, as well.

See how Butts navigated a challenging decision-making process as he witnessed a young eagle that appeared to be in distress.

Butts also happens to be an avid eagle photographer.  The eaglet’s dramatic story unfolds through his lens.

Butts shared his video with me for the purpose of making this video.

Photographer Christian Sasse of British Columbia graciously provided additional video and photographs for this project.

It’s my hope that this video will prove both compelling and educational, resulting in an effective teaching tool.

Please feel free to share.

RELATED LINKS:

Jeff Butts’ website:  eagleskyenet.com

Christian Sasse on Facebook:  facebook.com/SassePhoto

Hancock Wildlife Foundation:  http://www.hancockwildlife.org

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Beyond 90 Seconds blog Commentary DSLR Snohomish Snohomish River video Washington

September’s Symmetry: “Humpy Run” (Pink Salmon) on the Snohomish River

Post updated on July 14, 2013.

It’s an odd-numbered year, so watch-out!  Large numbers of pink salmon (nicknamed “humpies”) are about to return to Puget Sound.

Want to whet your appetite for the upcoming humpy run?  Check-out the video below.  It features a full-helping of beautiful scenery on the Snohomish River captured during the 2011 pink salmon season.

The shots were taken over the course of a few weeks during early mornings, middle of days, and evenings, too.

So, go ahead and click the video’s play button.  Cast off.  And slowly  reel-in this beautiful fish story.